Discussion:
Easiest way to move saved data from iPad mini to the Costco $300 128GB iPad 9.7" device?
(too old to reply)
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-03 20:35:12 UTC
Permalink
What's the easiest way to move saved data from an iPad mini to iPad 9.7"?
(when neither of the users has a laptop computer)

As a gift, I had a relative in another state (with lower sales tax) buy two
of those $300 128GB iPads from Costco today (they only had one color in
stock) where they called me just now on their drive home to ask a question
about transferring data.

Both women have no computer, and just the iPad mini's and they probably use
their real email address as their iCloud account, and neither is backing up
with the iCloud because it filled up in the first month of use for both of
them (essentially).

Given that pretty typical situation, they asked me how to back up, where
I'm sure there are multiple approaches, but where it would be useful to ask
what is a good way to back up data from one iPad to another for someone who
has only the default storage that Apple provides on the cloud.

My first thought is for them to move their data from the old Mini to the
iCloud in 5GB chunks, and then to the new iPad.

Is there an easy way to transfer filled iPad data from one to another?
nospam
2018-03-03 20:40:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
What's the easiest way to move saved data from an iPad mini to iPad 9.7"?
(when neither of the users has a laptop computer)
airdrop, sftp, dropbox, email and many other options.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-03 22:08:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
What's the easiest way to move saved data from an iPad mini to iPad 9.7"?
(when neither of the users has a laptop computer)
airdrop, sftp, dropbox, email and many other options.
All that sounds nice, but there are always huge limitations in how Apple
does stuff, for example, their data is certainly far larger than the 5GB
chunks they have available on iCloud (as just one example).

Another limitation is that Apple forces users to jail their data in app
storage space, so they have to go from one app storage space to another app
storage space, where these particular ladies won't even understand that
concept, let alone be able to do it on their own.

One way for them to get around that 5GB limitation of their existing iCloud
accounts might be that vaunted AirDrop(TM) brand of ad-hoc file services
you always say is so great.

This is a great chance to test out that vaunted AirDrop(TM) brand of ad hoc
file transfer services.

Can they bring over, from iPad Mini to Ipad 2017, all their email,
pictures, videos, movies, books, and other important data, in one fell
swoop using that vaunted AirDrop(TM) brand of ad-hoc file-transfer
services?

If so, that's what I'll look up for them to do since a PC is not involved
and the cloud accounts are too puny in size (and who wants their data on
the cloud anyway).
nospam
2018-03-03 22:18:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
What's the easiest way to move saved data from an iPad mini to iPad 9.7"?
(when neither of the users has a laptop computer)
airdrop, sftp, dropbox, email and many other options.
All that sounds nice, but there are always huge limitations in how Apple
does stuff, for example, their data is certainly far larger than the 5GB
chunks they have available on iCloud (as just one example).
the only limitations are ones you create yourself.

the rest of the world has no problems sharing content.

for some reason, you turn the simplest tasks into a complete
clusterfuck.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-03 22:22:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
the only limitations are ones you create yourself.
the rest of the world has no problems sharing content.
for some reason, you turn the simplest tasks into a complete
clusterfuck.
What you fail to understand is that /most/ of the solutions you propse are
actually unworkable outside of iTunes, and certainly outside the walled
garden.

This particular backup is, luckily, well entrenched /inside/ the walled
garden, but it's certainly outside of iTunes.

So, if your vaunted AirDrop(TM) brand of ad-hoc file-transfer services can
do what these two ladies want to do, why can't you just say so?

Or, does it not even do the simplest of things such as this?
nospam
2018-03-03 22:24:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
the only limitations are ones you create yourself.
the rest of the world has no problems sharing content.
for some reason, you turn the simplest tasks into a complete
clusterfuck.
What you fail to understand is that /most/ of the solutions you propse are
actually unworkable outside of iTunes, and certainly outside the walled
garden.
nope. what *you* fail to understand is that itunes is not required. i
did not even mention itunes *at* *all*.

like i said, you turn the simplest tasks into a clusterfuck.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-03 22:31:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
What you fail to understand is that /most/ of the solutions you propse are
actually unworkable outside of iTunes, and certainly outside the walled
garden.
nope. what *you* fail to understand is that itunes is not required. i
did not even mention itunes *at* *all*.
like i said, you turn the simplest tasks into a clusterfuck.
You never miss a chance to derail a question whenever your vaunted
solutions can't even do even the /simplest/ of tasks asked of them.

Most of your solutions work only inside the narrow confines of the walled
garden, or in very extreme corner cases (e.g., someone wants to back up
data which is a puny 5GB in size).

In this case, the good news is that these two ladies are both safely
ensconced inside the walled garden, each owning only iPads and iPhones.

So rather than waste time with you claiming imaginary iOS functionality for
the umpteenth time, I'll be wainting to see if there is someone on his ng
who knows how to transfer data from iPad to iPad that is far larger than
5GB, and scattered about.

I'll also be googling to see if your vaunted AirDrop(TM) brand of ad-hoc
file-transfer services can do this, which is perhaps the /simplest/ of all
tasks asked of it.

I'll let folks know what the search results are after I run them and
perhaps test them out on my own iPads.
nospam
2018-03-03 22:37:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
What you fail to understand is that /most/ of the solutions you propse are
actually unworkable outside of iTunes, and certainly outside the walled
garden.
nope. what *you* fail to understand is that itunes is not required. i
did not even mention itunes *at* *all*.
like i said, you turn the simplest tasks into a clusterfuck.
You never miss a chance to derail a question whenever your vaunted
solutions can't even do even the /simplest/ of tasks asked of them.
that would be you.

i listed *several* options and you went off on a rant rather than
actually bother trying anything.
Post by ultred ragnusen
Most of your solutions work only inside the narrow confines of the walled
garden, or in very extreme corner cases (e.g., someone wants to back up
data which is a puny 5GB in size).
also wrong.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 03:54:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
i listed *several* options and you went off on a rant rather than
actually bother trying anything.
Nospam,

In your haste to needlessly argue, you completely forgot what you said, and
you ignored that I acted positively & directly upon exactly what you said.

All you realistically suggested was AirDrop(TM) brand ad-hoc file-transfer
services, which is what I said I would explore, to see if it can be used
for non-technical people to transfer myriad files from an old iPad to a new
iPad.

The other stuff you listed is worthless in this scenario, where this is a
direct quote of what you listed:
"airdrop, sftp, dropbox, email and many other options."

Look at that list again!
1. AirDrop = I agreed with you that it was worth exploring for this purpose
2. SFTP = you have to be kidding - these are highly non technical people
3. Dropbox = again, you have to be kidding - it's just not feasible here
4. Email = yet again, you can't be serious - it's just not the right method
5. And many other options = you again fabricate imaginary iOS functionality

The /only/ suggestion in that list which will fit two non-technical ladies
who have old iPads where they want to bring their data over to the new
iPad, is potentially AirDrop(TM) brand of ad-hoc file-transfer services.

I agreed with you - and said I would try that between my iPads, so that I
could assess whether it would work for these two ladies for theirs.

Did you purchase too many arguments again, this week?
nospam
2018-03-04 04:08:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
All you realistically suggested was AirDrop(TM) brand ad-hoc file-transfer
services, which is what I said I would explore, to see if it can be used
for non-technical people to transfer myriad files from an old iPad to a new
iPad.
The other stuff you listed is worthless in this scenario, where this is a
"airdrop, sftp, dropbox, email and many other options."
nope. each has its own advantages and disadvantages.
Post by ultred ragnusen
Look at that list again!
1. AirDrop = I agreed with you that it was worth exploring for this purpose
it's the easiest method, but not the only one.
Post by ultred ragnusen
2. SFTP = you have to be kidding - these are highly non technical people
if they can tap, they can use it.
Post by ultred ragnusen
3. Dropbox = again, you have to be kidding - it's just not feasible here
of course it is, and also very easy.
Post by ultred ragnusen
4. Email = yet again, you can't be serious - it's just not the right method
it is for non-technical people.
Post by ultred ragnusen
5. And many other options = you again fabricate imaginary iOS functionality
nope.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 04:20:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
1. AirDrop = I agreed with you that it was worth exploring for this purpose
it's the easiest method, but not the only one.
I don't want to argue ... I just want to find a good solution for them.

If it was for me, I'd simply "mount" the iOS device on Linux and be done
with it after sliding all the files I want back and forth - but they don't
have desktops so that's not an option for them.

Given they're in the walled garden, I'll test out the AirDrop(TM) brand of
ad-hoc file-transfer services on my own iPads because this situation is
entirely ensconced within the narrow confines of the walled garden and
these are highly non-technical people - hence perfect for solutions devised
by Apple Marketing.

There may be a version-related problem that the first person has three (now
four) iPads and an iPhone, where one of her iPads is a pre-camera iPad from
circa 2010, while another is an iPad from circa 2012, and the third is an
ipad from 2014.

The second person only has an ipad mini and an iPhone, in addition to the
new iPad from Costco, both of which are more recently given as gifts to
her.

After I try AirDrop(TM) brand of ad-hoc file-transfer services, I'll let
you know if/how it works (the grandkids have my iPad since I almost never
use it nowadays, preferring the Android functionality).
Elden
2018-03-04 05:23:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
All you realistically suggested was AirDrop(TM) brand ad-hoc
file-transfer services, which is what I said I would explore, to see
if it can be used for non-technical people to transfer myriad files
from an old iPad to a new iPad.
The other stuff you listed is worthless in this scenario, where this
is a direct quote of what you listed: "airdrop, sftp, dropbox, email
and many other options."
nope. each has its own advantages and disadvantages.
I didn't see the OP's post because he's in my killfile. But IMHO by far
the very best way to transfer data from one iOS device to another is to
put your data in iCloud on the device you're coming from. Logon into
iCloud on the new device and walla. Job done.
--
-=Elden=-
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 05:32:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elden
I didn't see the OP's post because he's in my killfile. But IMHO by far
the very best way to transfer data from one iOS device to another is to
put your data in iCloud on the device you're coming from. Logon into
iCloud on the new device and walla. Job done.
5GB at a time...
Lloyd Parsons
2018-03-04 14:29:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Elden
I didn't see the OP's post because he's in my killfile. But IMHO by far
the very best way to transfer data from one iOS device to another is to
put your data in iCloud on the device you're coming from. Logon into
iCloud on the new device and walla. Job done.
5GB at a time...
Or upgrade their iCloud space enough to get the job done for one month.
Simple and cheap.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 20:15:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lloyd Parsons
Or upgrade their iCloud space enough to get the job done for one month.
Simple and cheap.
That's a good suggestion to just pay for one month of greater-than-5GB of
iCloud storage space, if you can get cloud space for just a month without
ever giving Apple your private information.

The great advantage of the iCloud over the other clouds is that it is
presumably easier to move the myriad settings and data spread out all over
the place in private storage areas from one iPad to another.

BTW, I just ordered one of those $300 gift-priced iPads for myself, so when
it arrives, I'll see how well it works with that 128GB of space, which I'll
use to put movies on for the grand kids to watch when the power goes out
(which happens about a dozen times a year where I live).
nospam
2018-03-05 00:35:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Lloyd Parsons
Or upgrade their iCloud space enough to get the job done for one month.
Simple and cheap.
That's a good suggestion to just pay for one month of greater-than-5GB of
iCloud storage space, if you can get cloud space for just a month without
ever giving Apple your private information.
tin foil, aisle 4.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 05:20:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
That's a good suggestion to just pay for one month of greater-than-5GB of
iCloud storage space, if you can get cloud space for just a month without
ever giving Apple your private information.
tin foil, aisle 4.
You are limited in that you can /only/ think about basic everyday privacy
in terms of paranoia, whereas I think about it in terms that a logical
sentient adult being would.

The logic I use is that of an adult, and which is patently simple - and yet
- that type of logic is that which you cannot possibly comprehend.

Does Apple /need/ your private information in order for the iPad to work?
Lloyd Parsons
2018-03-05 14:56:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
That's a good suggestion to just pay for one month of greater-than-5GB of
iCloud storage space, if you can get cloud space for just a month without
ever giving Apple your private information.
tin foil, aisle 4.
You are limited in that you can /only/ think about basic everyday privacy
in terms of paranoia, whereas I think about it in terms that a logical
sentient adult being would.
The logic I use is that of an adult, and which is patently simple - and yet
- that type of logic is that which you cannot possibly comprehend.
Does Apple /need/ your private information in order for the iPad to work?
Nope, but they do need some info when you buy something from them.
Probably about the same info you gave Costco or Amazon when ordering
from them.

But you should already know exactly what is needed since you claim you
help relatives with iOS devices and I think even claim you have one or
more.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 22:13:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lloyd Parsons
But you should already know exactly what is needed since you claim you
help relatives with iOS devices and I think even claim you have one or
more.
What you missed was my question to nospam was related to /purchasing/ extra
iCloud storage just to do something that's trivial on all other platforms.

You don't seem to know what even the half dozen apple apologists know,
which is that I gave Apple, years ago, a bogus name, of X, and a last name
of X and an address of X and a zip code of something like 00000.

Then, years later, with an iOS update, it forced a 'real' zip code (there's
an entire thread on that, for example), but the rest of the bogus
information it kept.

So I know far better than you do what Apple needs - but - get this - I have
zero plans of ever logging into the iCloud. Zero. None. Zip. Nada.

So Apple may need more information for the /transfer/ of files for these
people from one iPad to another, so what you missed was my question to
nospam was related to /purchasing/ extra iCloud storage.
Lloyd
2018-03-05 23:08:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Lloyd Parsons
But you should already know exactly what is needed since you claim you
help relatives with iOS devices and I think even claim you have one or
more.
What you missed was my question to nospam was related to /purchasing/ extra
iCloud storage just to do something that's trivial on all other platforms.
Just as trivial to do on iOS for those with any smarts at all.
Post by ultred ragnusen
You don't seem to know what even the half dozen apple apologists know,
which is that I gave Apple, years ago, a bogus name, of X, and a last name
of X and an address of X and a zip code of something like 00000.
No, I didn't know it. And what does it matter? You did something
stupid and want to brag about it?
Post by ultred ragnusen
Then, years later, with an iOS update, it forced a 'real' zip code (there's
an entire thread on that, for example), but the rest of the bogus
information it kept.
Oh I'm sure there is a thread about it. Your trolling knows no bounds.
Post by ultred ragnusen
So I know far better than you do what Apple needs - but - get this - I have
zero plans of ever logging into the iCloud. Zero. None. Zip. Nada.
OK, then fuck off and figure it out for yourself. Your relatives
that are getting those iPads would be well advised to ignore your
idiocy and just do things the right and easy way.
Post by ultred ragnusen
So Apple may need more information for the /transfer/ of files for these
people from one iPad to another, so what you missed was my question to
nospam was related to /purchasing/ extra iCloud storage.
Apple doesn't need more info to do that, they do need your
information that is required to make a purchase. And just like
any other online purchase, you either provide the info or they
politely tell you to FOAD.
--
Lloyd
Elden
2018-03-05 00:19:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lloyd Parsons
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Elden
I didn't see the OP's post because he's in my killfile. But IMHO by
far the very best way to transfer data from one iOS device to
another is to put your data in iCloud on the device you're coming
from. Logon into iCloud on the new device and walla. Job done.
5GB at a time...
Or upgrade their iCloud space enough to get the job done for one
month. Simple and cheap.
Yes, if the $0.99 per month for more storage is too much, then one
should probably just sell their devices and call it a day.
--
-=Elden=-
Jolly Roger
2018-03-05 00:32:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elden
Post by Lloyd Parsons
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Elden
I didn't see the OP's post because he's in my killfile. But IMHO by
far the very best way to transfer data from one iOS device to
another is to put your data in iCloud on the device you're coming
from. Logon into iCloud on the new device and walla. Job done.
5GB at a time...
Or upgrade their iCloud space enough to get the job done for one
month. Simple and cheap.
Yes, if the $0.99 per month for more storage is too much, then one
should probably just sell their devices and call it a day.
Even if they do upgrade to a larger plan, he'll no doubt completely fuck
it up. Rather than simply upgrading their iCloud storage, doing an iOS
backup to iCloud, then restoring from that iCloud backup to the new
device, he'll no doubt guide them through many twists and turns on some
ultra-idiotic maze run of "copy this here, copy that there" procedures,
which won't be nearly as simple or complete a migration as if he had
just done it the simple way, all because: troll. He's a clueless
jackass. I feel sorry for anyone who has to interact with him.
--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 05:25:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jolly Roger
Even if they do upgrade to a larger plan, he'll no doubt completely fuck
it up. Rather than simply upgrading their iCloud storage, doing an iOS
backup to iCloud, then restoring from that iCloud backup to the new
device, he'll no doubt guide them through many twists and turns on some
ultra-idiotic maze run of "copy this here, copy that there" procedures,
which won't be nearly as simple or complete a migration as if he had
just done it the simple way, all because: troll. He's a clueless
jackass. I feel sorry for anyone who has to interact with him.
What's interesting is that you, Jolly Roger, only seem to know one way, the
Apple way, of doing anything.

It's how a child thinks of the world...
nospam
2018-03-05 17:52:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Jolly Roger
Even if they do upgrade to a larger plan, he'll no doubt completely fuck
it up. Rather than simply upgrading their iCloud storage, doing an iOS
backup to iCloud, then restoring from that iCloud backup to the new
device, he'll no doubt guide them through many twists and turns on some
ultra-idiotic maze run of "copy this here, copy that there" procedures,
which won't be nearly as simple or complete a migration as if he had
just done it the simple way, all because: troll. He's a clueless
jackass. I feel sorry for anyone who has to interact with him.
What's interesting is that you, Jolly Roger, only seem to know one way, the
Apple way, of doing anything.
as usual, you're talking about yourself.

*you* only know one way and insist on *only* that way.

you refuse to learn about alternatives that are easier, faster and more
efficient, none of which are 'the apple way'.

also, i'm quite certain jr knows *many* different ways to transfer
content and chooses which one works best for a given situation, which
is not necessarily the same method each time.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 22:18:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
also, i'm quite certain jr knows *many* different ways to transfer
content and chooses which one works best for a given situation, which
is not necessarily the same method each time.
BTW, speaking of transferring content, I searched today for how to archive
Gmail the easiest way (since my 15GB are full):
Loading Image...

Archiving Gmail turns out to be really easy!
https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout/

What's a good way to back up Gmail when you've reached the size limit?
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/alt.os.linux/6YHdHFcpGxs

Here are my stats, where even just my mail wouldn't fit on the puny default
iCloud storage...
a. Roughly 30K email messages
b. Roughly about 5 years time
c. Roughly about 15GB in storage (zipped archive from Google is 10GB)
Loading Image...
Lloyd
2018-03-05 23:10:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
also, i'm quite certain jr knows *many* different ways to transfer
content and chooses which one works best for a given situation, which
is not necessarily the same method each time.
BTW, speaking of transferring content, I searched today for how to archive
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/05/gmail_bck_0296fcc.jpg
Archiving Gmail turns out to be really easy!
https://takeout.google.com/settings/takeout/
What's a good way to back up Gmail when you've reached the size limit?
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/alt.os.linux/6YHdHFcpGxs
Here are my stats, where even just my mail wouldn't fit on the puny default
iCloud storage...
a. Roughly 30K email messages
b. Roughly about 5 years time
c. Roughly about 15GB in storage (zipped archive from Google is 10GB)
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/05/gmail_bck_05.jpg
What an anal SOB you are. Of what value are 5 year old emails? I
think my oldest might be 2 years old, and there are very few of
them over a year old. Just no real value.
--
Lloyd
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 19:42:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lloyd
What an anal SOB you are. Of what value are 5 year old emails? I
think my oldest might be 2 years old, and there are very few of
them over a year old. Just no real value.
Well, for one thing, I've written over 10K application notes, which are all
archived in my emails as they are sent about to others to improve.

From that, I'm able to do something like this, which you can't do on iOS no
matter how hard you try.

Loading Image...
ElfinArc
2018-03-06 22:16:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Lloyd
What an anal SOB you are. Of what value are 5 year old emails? I
think my oldest might be 2 years old, and there are very few of
them over a year old. Just no real value.
Well, for one thing, I've written over 10K application notes, which are all
archived in my emails as they are sent about to others to improve.
From that, I'm able to do something like this, which you can't do on iOS no
matter how hard you try.
http://i.cubeupload.com/ZkqbqI.jpg
That is one butt ugly screen and way to busy
--
Elfin
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-09 03:13:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by ElfinArc
That is one butt ugly screen and way to busy
:)

The iOS launcher is like a Model T Ford in today's modern-launcher age.

Did you notice that the icons can go on any grid (or no grid) I want?
Did you notice I can change the shape, color, names, whatever?
I can have multiple icons in multiple logical places.

And you probably didn't even notice that the layout was for one-handed use!

On Android, you can do almost anything you want with your desktop screens.
There's a setting for everything.

That's what /modern/ app launchers do.

The iOS launcher is mired in the primitive mud shales of a decade ago,
where it never grew up. It was /great/ for a ten-year old mobile device, as
it set the standard.

But the iOS launcher is like a Model T Ford in today's modern-launcher age.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 05:24:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Elden
Yes, if the $0.99 per month for more storage is too much, then one
should probably just sell their devices and call it a day.
Since I don't know you, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that you
only looked at the issue superficially.

Hence, I will advise you gently that the issue of /paying/ for your data to
be held ransom on the net is not only one of cost, which you seem to be
fixated upon.

There are adult issues involved such as privacy, philosophy, and
pragmatism.
Lloyd Parsons
2018-03-05 14:59:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Elden
Yes, if the $0.99 per month for more storage is too much, then one
should probably just sell their devices and call it a day.
Since I don't know you, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that you
only looked at the issue superficially.
Hence, I will advise you gently that the issue of /paying/ for your data to
be held ransom on the net is not only one of cost, which you seem to be
fixated upon.
There are adult issues involved such as privacy, philosophy, and
pragmatism.
LOL! Its more like it allows you to come up with all the BS reasons
why something is bad or good, and of course, gives you the wiggle room
to bitch about how Apple is trying to screw you.
Jolly Roger
2018-03-03 23:19:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
the only limitations are ones you create yourself.
the rest of the world has no problems sharing content.
for some reason, you turn the simplest tasks into a complete
clusterfuck.
What you fail to understand is that /most/ of the solutions you propse are
actually unworkable outside of iTunes, and certainly outside the walled
garden.
nope. what *you* fail to understand is that itunes is not required. i
did not even mention itunes *at* *all*.
He thinks everything must go through iTunes, due to his irrational fear
and hatred of iTunes. ; )
Post by nospam
like i said, you turn the simplest tasks into a clusterfuck.
He's an idiot, and a troll.
--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 03:58:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jolly Roger
He thinks everything must go through iTunes, due to his irrational fear
and hatred of iTunes. ; )
Hi Jolly Roger,

Even nospam understood that there is no desktop computer involved in this
question, where only you, of all people who read it, couldn't comprehend
that two devices can communicate with each other outside of iTunes.

Only you are actually that stupid to bring iTunes into the picture.

Please assure us all that you don't vote.
Please.
nospam
2018-03-04 04:08:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Jolly Roger
He thinks everything must go through iTunes, due to his irrational fear
and hatred of iTunes. ; )
Hi Jolly Roger,
Even nospam understood that there is no desktop computer involved in this
question, where only you, of all people who read it, couldn't comprehend
that two devices can communicate with each other outside of iTunes.
Only you are actually that stupid to bring iTunes into the picture.
*you* were the first to mention itunes.
Jolly Roger
2018-03-04 04:57:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Jolly Roger
He thinks everything must go through iTunes, due to his irrational fear
and hatred of iTunes. ; )
Hi Jolly Roger,
Even nospam understood that there is no desktop computer involved in this
question, where only you, of all people who read it, couldn't comprehend
that two devices can communicate with each other outside of iTunes.
Only you are actually that stupid to bring iTunes into the picture.
*you* were the first to mention itunes.
He's such an idiot...
--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 05:56:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jolly Roger
He's such an idiot...
If I'm such an idiot compared to the genius that you are, tell me how you
burn your mobile devices' entire visible file system directly from iOS to a
couple of DVD, as I just did just now for my Android phone, without
installing /anything/ on tbe desktop (works for Linux, Windows, and Mac).

Q: How do you do something as simple as this on iOS?
Loading Image...

What's that?
You just can't?


Thought so.
nospam
2018-03-04 06:12:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Jolly Roger
He's such an idiot...
If I'm such an idiot compared to the genius that you are, tell me how you
burn your mobile devices' entire visible file system directly from iOS to a
couple of DVD, as I just did just now for my Android phone, without
installing /anything/ on tbe desktop (works for Linux, Windows, and Mac).
not only is that a complete waste of time for all sorts of reasons, but
it's also amazingly stupid.

you rant about icloud and its supposed 5 gigabyte chunks, but go on to
advocate backing up in ~4.3 gig chunks to non-archival physical media.

a 256 gig iphone filled to capacity would need about 60 dvds, which
would take *many* hours to burn them all.

by the time you're done, the backup would already be stale.

meanwhile, ios devices back themselves up automatically, with *no* user
action required.

computers are there to do work *for* you.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 06:36:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
you rant about icloud and its supposed 5 gigabyte chunks, but go on to
advocate backing up in ~4.3 gig chunks to non-archival physical media.
You've got to be joking about putting your data on the cloud.

I have two terabytes of disk space on my main desktop, and where I can plug
in any number of terabytes any times I want to, and you rave about a measly
5GB on the iCloud where you have to put your data on the Internet just to
get it from one device to another?

Besides, with the method you just pooh poohed, I can easily transfer
anything I want from any one Android device to any other Android device, or
to any number of Android devices, whether or not the owner is in my
contacts list for heaven's sake, on my own LAN, without installing
/anything/ on the desktop.

You can't even come close to that capability - and you know it.

Answer this simple question, where you /know/ I can do it easily:

Q: How do you transfer files from your iOS device to any other iOS device
(whether or not the owner is in your contacts and whether or not you have a
log in to that device) on your own LAN without having to put anything on
the net?

A: You can't.

On Android, it just works.
joe
2018-03-05 14:00:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
you rant about icloud and its supposed 5 gigabyte chunks, but go on to
advocate backing up in ~4.3 gig chunks to non-archival physical media.
You've got to be joking about putting your data on the cloud.
I have two terabytes of disk space on my main desktop, and where I can plug
in any number of terabytes any times I want to, and you rave about a measly
5GB on the iCloud where you have to put your data on the Internet just to
get it from one device to another?
Besides, with the method you just pooh poohed, I can easily transfer
anything I want from any one Android device to any other Android device, or
to any number of Android devices, whether or not the owner is in my
contacts list for heaven's sake, on my own LAN, without installing
/anything/ on the desktop.
You can't even come close to that capability - and you know it.
Q: How do you transfer files from your iOS device to any other iOS device
(whether or not the owner is in your contacts and whether or not you have a
log in to that device) on your own LAN without having to put anything on
the net?
A: You can't.
On Android, it just works.
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
nospam
2018-03-05 15:58:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by ultred ragnusen
Besides, with the method you just pooh poohed, I can easily transfer
anything I want from any one Android device to any other Android device, or
to any number of Android devices, whether or not the owner is in my
contacts list for heaven's sake, on my own LAN, without installing
/anything/ on the desktop.
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
it's called juice jacking.

<https://krebsonsecurity.com/2011/08/beware-of-juice-jacking/>
³One attendee claimed his phone had USB transfer off and he would be
fine.  When he plugged in, it instantly went into USB transfer mode,²
Markus recalls.  ³He then sheepishly said,  ŒGuess that setting
doesn¹t work.'²
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 22:23:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
Heh heh ... spoken like a true Apple Apologist!

This screenshot should have you pissing in your pants in fear and hiding
all the USB cables in the house!
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/android_usb_on_windows.jpg.

This one too, where it's over the Wi-Fi:
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/android_ftp_on_windows.jpg

Heck, this ability to load any launcher to set up your desktop should scare
the shit out of you too!
Loading Image...

Oooooooooh. Scary!
sms
2018-03-06 17:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
You have to unlock your Android device in order to view the file system
on a computer.

You can see the difference between how it looks, on Windows, for a
locked versus unlocked device at <Loading Image...>.

The security of your device, whether iOS or Android, is as secure as you
choose to make it. As with iOS, on Android devices you can use
biometrics or use a code (with Android you can also use a pattern) to
unlock your device.

Low end Android devices lack a fingerprint scanner, but mid-range
devices (generally $150 (unsubsidized) and up) do usually have one, as
of course do the flagships. I.e. our favorite nym-shifter likes the LG
Stylo 3 Plus which costs about $210 unsubsidized, and has a fingerprint
scanner; the LG Stylo non-Plus (about $120) also has one (but lacks fast
charging and NFC).

The most secure biometric used on phones is iris scanning, but that is
not that common on phones, followed by fingerprint scanning. The least
secure biometric is face recognition, which has both the highest false
rejection rate AND the highest false acceptance rate.

<Loading Image...>
with the whole article at
<https://www.bayometric.com/biometrics-face-finger-iris-palm-voice/>.
Even companies that use face recognition have issue multiple warnings
that it is not as secure as other biometrics, period.

What you really want to do is to ensure that whatever device you choose,
on whatever operating system, has either a fingerprint reader or an iris
scanner, and that if it's an iris scanner that it can be set to use iris
scanning ONLY. The Samsung S9 reportedly uses a combination of facial
recognition and iris scanning that is less secure than iris scanning
only, but face recognition is easier for the user, and faster than iris
scanning. Fortunately you can always just use the fingerprint scanner.
On devices without a fingerprint scanner you can still us a pass code,
though this is less secure than a fingerprint scanner.
nospam
2018-03-06 17:22:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by joe
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
You have to unlock your Android device in order to view the file system
on a computer.
except that it's easy to bypass that. not so on ios.
Post by sms
The most secure biometric used on phones is iris scanning, but that is
not that common on phones, followed by fingerprint scanning. The least
secure biometric is face recognition, which has both the highest false
rejection rate AND the highest false acceptance rate.
absolutely false. iris scanning in phones is a pale imitation of what's
found elsewhere. for samsung, it can be spoofed with a photo.
Post by sms
What you really want to do is to ensure that whatever device you choose,
on whatever operating system, has either a fingerprint reader or an iris
scanner, and that if it's an iris scanner that it can be set to use iris
scanning ONLY.
nope.

an iphone x with its face recognition is much more secure than
fingerprint sensors or iris scanning on phones.
Post by sms
The Samsung S9 reportedly uses a combination of facial
recognition and iris scanning that is less secure than iris scanning
only, but face recognition is easier for the user, and faster than iris
scanning. Fortunately you can always just use the fingerprint scanner.
On devices without a fingerprint scanner you can still us a pass code,
though this is less secure than a fingerprint scanner.
the s9 is marginally better than the s8, both of which are trivially
spoofed.

meanwhile, the iphone x and its face recognition is *very* difficult to
spoof.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 20:06:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by joe
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
You have to unlock your Android device in order to view the file system
on a computer.
Wrong!

Please don't say such things, particularly on an Apple newsgroup because
the Apple Apologists have no concept of fact (they get all their 'facts'
from Apple Marketing brochures), so they never ever double check
what fits absolutely beautifully into their imaginary belief system.

Every one of those screenshots I provided are on an un-rooted Moto G
that I just started to use (it was one of the gift phones of years ago
handed back to me to play with). http://i.cubeupload.com/ZkqbqI.jpg

You'll note that, since this is an Apple newsgroup, it's filled with
children who nit pick since they can't prove any of their imaginary believs
otherwise, so I always said "visible" when I mentioned the file system.

1. An unjailbroken iOS device has almost no visible file system to access
2. An unrooted Android device has plenty of visible file system to access
3. A rooted iOS or Android device has almost all the file system visible

The level of visibility depends only on whether you're root (where you can
see everything) or if you're not root (in which case you can still see far
more than you can on iOS - and - in fact - you can see all that you /need/
to see).

Again, this USB screenshot of the visible file system is on an un-rooted
stock Moto G, where my experience is the same with /all/ Android phones.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/android_usb_on_windows.jpg.

It's the same visible file system over Wi-Fi (AFAIK):
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/android_ftp_on_windows.jpg

Of course, I've also unlocked Android (which is trivial to do on my S3),
which then garners me access to everything, e.g., the /etc/HOSTS file, for
example, so that I can slide the hosts file from Windows over to Android.
Post by sms
You can see the difference between how it looks, on Windows, for a
locked versus unlocked device at <http://oi66.tinypic.com/1z4ew06.jpg>.
I realize from that screenshot that you skipped a step. If you put any free
FTP server on your Android phone, and then right click on Windows to "add a
network location", you can access all of the visible file system on
Android, over Windows, without putting a spec of software on Windows.
Post by sms
The security of your device, whether iOS or Android, is as secure as you
choose to make it.
Not really. They're all insecure. The weakest links are all the same.
And there's nothing realistic you can do about it.
Post by sms
As with iOS, on Android devices you can use
biometrics or use a code (with Android you can also use a pattern) to
unlock your device.
All you guys think everyone is going to go frontal on your phone.

That's like thinking the burglar is going to come down the chimney instead
of sneaking through the back door.

Sure, /some/ burglars sneak in through the chimney ... but that's not your
major threat.
Post by sms
Low end Android devices lack a fingerprint scanner, but mid-range
devices (generally $150 (unsubsidized) and up) do usually have one, as
of course do the flagships. I.e. our favorite nym-shifter likes the LG
Stylo 3 Plus which costs about $210 unsubsidized, and has a fingerprint
scanner; the LG Stylo non-Plus (about $120) also has one (but lacks fast
charging and NFC).
I bought a bunch of those back-fingerprint 32GB $130 octocore LG Stylo 3
Plus phones, and I may still get one at $150 at the local T-Mobile store
(if it's still on sale), where, at that price, it has better features than
the $300 128GB iPad I just bought and which will arrive later this week.
Post by sms
The most secure biometric used on phones is iris scanning, but that is
not that common on phones, followed by fingerprint scanning. The least
secure biometric is face recognition, which has both the highest false
rejection rate AND the highest false acceptance rate.
Ummm.... I don't even use a PIN on my current Moto-G hand-me-down phone.
That circa 2014 phone can do things that no iOS device can hope to do.
http://i.cubeupload.com/ZkqbqI.jpg
Post by sms
Even companies that use face recognition have issue multiple warnings
that it is not as secure as other biometrics, period.
Face it. Face recognition is a marketing gimmick for easily fooled fools.
Post by sms
What you really want to do is to ensure that whatever device you choose,
on whatever operating system, has either a fingerprint reader or an iris
scanner, and that if it's an iris scanner that it can be set to use iris
scanning ONLY.
What's wrong with a six-digit pin?
Post by sms
The Samsung S9 reportedly uses a combination of facial
recognition and iris scanning that is less secure than iris scanning
only, but face recognition is easier for the user, and faster than iris
scanning. Fortunately you can always just use the fingerprint scanner.
On devices without a fingerprint scanner you can still us a pass code,
though this is less secure than a fingerprint scanner.
Not really. They can't get a passcode from an unconscious or unwilling or
dead person, while they can get a fingerprint from all three (if they
hurry).
nospam
2018-03-06 20:14:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
What's wrong with a six-digit pin?
it's not as secure as a 7 digit pin.

it's nowhere near as secure as an alphanumeric passphrase that uses
letters, numbers *and* symbols.
Post by ultred ragnusen
They can't get a passcode from an unconscious or unwilling or
dead person, while they can get a fingerprint from all three (if they
hurry).
no they can't.

plus, the user can, at any time, disable biometrics entirely.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 21:27:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
plus, the user can, at any time, disable biometrics entirely.
Not if they're unconscious, or dead they can't.

Anyway, you can keep spouting what Apple Marketing tells you to spout,
because, as you well know, I don't even use a 4-digit pin.

You know why?

Because I know enough about mobile devices to known that they all suffer
from the same set of weak links.

You love to cry that you're protected from the burglar climbing into your
house from the chimney (which is exactly what Apple Marketing cleverly
wants you to think) ... but ... the burglar has /plenty/ of other ways to
get into your house.

To wit.
He's not going to go frontal, using the most expensive means possible,
which is what you continually extol your protection of.
nospam
2018-03-06 21:34:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
plus, the user can, at any time, disable biometrics entirely.
Not if they're unconscious, or dead they can't.
it doesn't work at all if they're dead.
Post by ultred ragnusen
Anyway, you can keep spouting what Apple Marketing tells you to spout,
because, as you well know, I don't even use a 4-digit pin.
You know why?
because you're stupid.
Post by ultred ragnusen
Because I know enough about mobile devices to known that they all suffer
from the same set of weak links.
as you've been repeatedly told, that is absolutely false.
sms
2018-03-06 21:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by sms
Post by joe
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
You have to unlock your Android device in order to view the file system
on a computer.
Wrong!
You misunderstand what I was saying. I wasn't referring to a carrier
unlock, or a root, I meant that you have to do a screen unlock before
you see the file system appear on your computer. I included what it
looks like before and after the screen unlock.

The key thing is that someone can't steal your phone and plug it into a
computer and see anything unless they can unlock the screen.
nospam
2018-03-06 21:11:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by sms
Post by joe
That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices.
You have to unlock your Android device in order to view the file system
on a computer.
Wrong!
You misunderstand what I was saying. I wasn't referring to a carrier
unlock, or a root, I meant that you have to do a screen unlock before
you see the file system appear on your computer. I included what it
looks like before and after the screen unlock.
what you neglect to mention is how easy it is to bypass that on android.
Post by sms
The key thing is that someone can't steal your phone and plug it into a
computer and see anything unless they can unlock the screen.
on android, they absolutely can in nearly every case.

on ios, it's effectively impossible.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 21:32:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
You misunderstand what I was saying. I wasn't referring to a carrier
unlock, or a root, I meant that you have to do a screen unlock before
you see the file system appear on your computer. I included what it
looks like before and after the screen unlock.
oooooooops. I apologize. I misunderstood what you were trying to show when
you used the word "lock" which I took to mean "root" (which /is/ definitely
related to how much of the file system is visible.

mea culpa. I publicly apologize.

My facts were correct; but my interpretation of your words was incorrect.
I'm sorry.

This is why I enjoy reading your posts, and why I feel I have a lot to
learn from you. Personally, I don't lock my screen, so I don't run into
such issues since I have full access to any device I want to have access to
that is connected to my LAN (where I must have almost a dozen access points
scattered around the house and property for people to connect to).
Post by sms
The key thing is that someone can't steal your phone and plug it into a
computer and see anything unless they can unlock the screen.
As you know, there are plenty of security vulnerabilities in /all/ consumer
grade mobile devices, so, I wouldn't be so sure of that - but I understand
your point that the lock screen is one small step in the security hierarchy
on most consumer mobile devices (except mine).
sms
2018-03-06 21:46:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by sms
You misunderstand what I was saying. I wasn't referring to a carrier
unlock, or a root, I meant that you have to do a screen unlock before
you see the file system appear on your computer. I included what it
looks like before and after the screen unlock.
oooooooops. I apologize. I misunderstood what you were trying to show when
you used the word "lock" which I took to mean "root" (which /is/ definitely
related to how much of the file system is visible.
mea culpa. I publicly apologize.
My facts were correct; but my interpretation of your words was incorrect.
I'm sorry.
It doesn't matter, I was just trying to explain to Joe that there is no
security risk in having the capability to look at the Android file system.
nospam
2018-03-06 21:59:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
It doesn't matter, I was just trying to explain to Joe that there is no
security risk in having the capability to look at the Android file system.
there is.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 22:06:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
I was just trying to explain to Joe that there is no
security risk in having the capability to look at the Android file system.
That is reasonable, where, it seems that you're like I am, in that our self
worth isn't wrapped up in what others may think of us.

BTW, notice that Joe, in particular, spouts /exactly/ what Apple Marketing
has taught him to spout?

Here's what he said:
"That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices."

I've noticed that even well-educated iOS users tend to believe everything
that Apple Marketing has fed them, which is why you'll never hear me ever
say that Apple Marketing is stupid.

Apple marketing knows exactly what their customers /want/ to believe.

And what they believe, makes them /feel/ safe.

Just like when Momma marketing tells little Joey that monsters can't get
out of the closet if she gently closes the door when she turns off the
lights at night.
sms
2018-03-07 00:53:47 UTC
Permalink
On 3/6/2018 2:06 PM, ultred ragnusen wrote:

<snip>
Post by ultred ragnusen
BTW, notice that Joe, in particular, spouts /exactly/ what Apple Marketing
has taught him to spout?
"That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices."
Give me a break. I have never heard anyone from Apple say any such thing.

You need to distinguish what uninformed people like Joe and nospam say
and what Apple actually says. Apple probably wishes they could stop
people "helping them."
joe
2018-03-07 13:38:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
<snip>
Post by ultred ragnusen
BTW, notice that Joe, in particular, spouts /exactly/ what Apple Marketing
has taught him to spout?
  "That sounds like an android device is an open book to any miscreant
who
wants to steal your data or hack your machine. Another reason to avoid
android devices."
Give me a break. I have never heard anyone from Apple say any such thing.
You need to distinguish what uninformed people like Joe and nospam say
and what Apple actually says. Apple probably wishes they could stop
people "helping them."
You'll note that my comment began with "That seems" as it was a response
to the statement made by ultred indicating that just plugging in a
android device exposed much of the file system.

If it was an uninformed comment, the lack of information was ultred's
lack of presenting the whole picture.

However, I can plug an android tablet into a Windows machine while the
device is in the 'sleep' state, and the file system is still visible to
Windows OS. No need to unlock.
sms
2018-03-07 16:44:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
However, I can plug an android tablet into a Windows machine while the
device is in the 'sleep' state, and the file system is still visible to
Windows OS.  No need to unlock.
You need to keep the USB port in "Charge Only" mode. You can't change to
MTP mode, and view the file system, without unlocking the screen and
changing to MTP mode.

Starting with Android 6.0 the device will automatically revert to
charge-only mode when unplugged so you don't have to do it manually. In
5.0 and earlier, the USB mode sticks and doesn't revert automatically
when unplugged.
nospam
2018-03-07 16:54:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by joe
However, I can plug an android tablet into a Windows machine while the
device is in the 'sleep' state, and the file system is still visible to
Windows OS.  No need to unlock.
You need to keep the USB port in "Charge Only" mode. You can't change to
MTP mode, and view the file system, without unlocking the screen and
changing to MTP mode.
that's easily bypassed.
joe
2018-03-07 17:06:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by joe
However, I can plug an android tablet into a Windows machine while the
device is in the 'sleep' state, and the file system is still visible
to Windows OS.  No need to unlock.
You need to keep the USB port in "Charge Only" mode. You can't change to
MTP mode, and view the file system, without unlocking the screen and
changing to MTP mode.
Starting with Android 6.0 the device will automatically revert to
charge-only mode when unplugged so you don't have to do it manually. In
5.0 and earlier, the USB mode sticks and doesn't revert automatically
when unplugged.
Where is this setting on android 5.1.1?
sms
2018-03-07 19:55:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by joe
Post by sms
Post by joe
However, I can plug an android tablet into a Windows machine while
the device is in the 'sleep' state, and the file system is still
visible to Windows OS.  No need to unlock.
You need to keep the USB port in "Charge Only" mode. You can't change
to MTP mode, and view the file system, without unlocking the screen
and changing to MTP mode.
Starting with Android 6.0 the device will automatically revert to
charge-only mode when unplugged so you don't have to do it manually.
In 5.0 and earlier, the USB mode sticks and doesn't revert
automatically when unplugged.
Where is this setting on android 5.1.1?
When you plug the tablet into your computer it comes up in your
Notifications as:

"Charge tablet
Tap for more USB options"

If you tap, you get three choices:
Charge tablet
Media Device (MTP)
Send Images (PTP)

Whatever you select sticks (with Lollipop). In Marshmallow it doesn't stick.
joe
2018-03-07 20:06:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by joe
Post by sms
Post by joe
However, I can plug an android tablet into a Windows machine while
the device is in the 'sleep' state, and the file system is still
visible to Windows OS.  No need to unlock.
You need to keep the USB port in "Charge Only" mode. You can't change
to MTP mode, and view the file system, without unlocking the screen
and changing to MTP mode.
Starting with Android 6.0 the device will automatically revert to
charge-only mode when unplugged so you don't have to do it manually.
In 5.0 and earlier, the USB mode sticks and doesn't revert
automatically when unplugged.
Where is this setting on android 5.1.1?
When you plug the tablet into your computer it comes up in your
"Charge tablet
Tap for more USB options"
Charge tablet
Media Device (MTP)
Send Images (PTP)
Whatever you select sticks (with Lollipop). In Marshmallow it doesn't stick.
Thanks
nospam
2018-03-04 13:50:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
you rant about icloud and its supposed 5 gigabyte chunks, but go on to
advocate backing up in ~4.3 gig chunks to non-archival physical media.
You've got to be joking about putting your data on the cloud.
whoosh.
Savageduck
2018-03-04 06:13:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Jolly Roger
He thinks everything must go through iTunes, due to his irrational fear
and hatred of iTunes. ; )
Hi Jolly Roger,
Even nospam understood that there is no desktop computer involved in this
question, where only you, of all people who read it, couldn't comprehend
that two devices can communicate with each other outside of iTunes.
Only you are actually that stupid to bring iTunes into the picture.
*you* were the first to mention itunes.
There is always something such as this:

<https://www.sandisk.com/home/mobile-device-storage/ixpand>
--
Regards,
Savageduck
sms
2018-03-05 01:38:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Savageduck
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Jolly Roger
He thinks everything must go through iTunes, due to his irrational fear
and hatred of iTunes. ; )
Hi Jolly Roger,
Even nospam understood that there is no desktop computer involved in this
question, where only you, of all people who read it, couldn't comprehend
that two devices can communicate with each other outside of iTunes.
Only you are actually that stupid to bring iTunes into the picture.
*you* were the first to mention itunes.
<https://www.sandisk.com/home/mobile-device-storage/ixpand>
So why is it that you can't use a CCK to transfer from an iOS devices to
a Micro SD card, but this Sandisk devices allows it?

It's also incredible that a 256GB USB 3.0 and Micro USB Flash drive
costs 1/3 what the USB 3.0/Lightning version costs. And with an Android
device you can buy a $1 USB OTG cable and use any USB stick.
nospam
2018-03-05 01:40:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
So why is it that you can't use a CCK to transfer from an iOS devices to
a Micro SD card, but this Sandisk devices allows it?
custom app.
Savageduck
2018-03-05 17:36:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by sms
So why is it that you can't use a CCK to transfer from an iOS devices to
a Micro SD card, but this Sandisk devices allows it?
custom app.
Yup!
... and it is free.
--
Regards,
Savageduck
Savageduck
2018-03-05 17:34:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by Savageduck
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Jolly Roger
He thinks everything must go through iTunes, due to his irrational fear
and hatred of iTunes. ; )
Hi Jolly Roger,
Even nospam understood that there is no desktop computer involved in this
question, where only you, of all people who read it, couldn't comprehend
that two devices can communicate with each other outside of iTunes.
Only you are actually that stupid to bring iTunes into the picture.
*you* were the first to mention itunes.
<https://www.sandisk.com/home/mobile-device-storage/ixpand>
So why is it that you can't use a CCK to transfer from an iOS devices to
a Micro SD card, but this Sandisk devices allows it?
Who cares?
It works, and it works well.
Post by sms
It's also incredible that a 256GB USB 3.0 and Micro USB Flash drive
costs 1/3 what the USB 3.0/Lightning version costs. And with an Android
device you can buy a $1 USB OTG cable and use any USB stick.
... and does that work on a Lightning iOS device?

I use a 128GB version with my iPhone and my iPad Pro. It hasn’t failed me
yet.
--
Regards,
Savageduck
sms
2018-03-05 18:12:12 UTC
Permalink
On 3/5/2018 9:34 AM, Savageduck wrote:

<snip>
Post by Savageduck
Who cares?
It works, and it works well.
True, and it's a significant concession by Apple to allow a device like
that to both import and export files.

I'm just in shock that it costs 3x the price per GB for a Sandisk USB
3.0 + Lightning Flash memory stick as it does for a Sandisk USB 3.0 +
Micro USB Flash memory stick. I still may have our IT department order
me one since I often need to transfer files to non-iOS devices.

<https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1307460-REG/sandisk_sddd3_256g_a46_256gb_usb_3_0.html?sts=pi>

<https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1307457-REG/sandisk_sdix30c_256g_an6ne_256gb_ixpand_flash_drive.html>
nospam
2018-03-05 18:14:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by Savageduck
Who cares?
It works, and it works well.
True, and it's a significant concession by Apple to allow a device like
that to both import and export files.
no it isn't.

there is no restriction on what third party apps can transfer via the
lightning port (and previously the dock port).
Jolly Roger
2018-03-03 23:18:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by nospam
Post by ultred ragnusen
What's the easiest way to move saved data from an iPad mini to
iPad 9.7"? (when neither of the users has a laptop computer)
airdrop, sftp, dropbox, email and many other options.
All that sounds nice, but there are always huge limitations in how
Apple does stuff, for example, their data is certainly far larger
than the 5GB chunks they have available on iCloud (as just one
example).
the only limitations are ones you create yourself.
the rest of the world has no problems sharing content.
While he bumbles around, the rest of us already shared our content and
left the fucking house. He's hopelessly lost in today's technologies,
and hopelessly stuck in the past, which is why he resorts to completely
asinine things like installing fucking *FTP* *servers* on his *mobile*
devices just to move individual files around on his archaic systems.
It's pathetic.
Post by nospam
for some reason, you turn the simplest tasks into a complete
clusterfuck.
The reason is trolling.
--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 03:44:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jolly Roger
While he bumbles around, the rest of us already shared our content and
left the fucking house. He's hopelessly lost in today's technologies,
and hopelessly stuck in the past, which is why he resorts to completely
asinine things like installing fucking *FTP* *servers* on his *mobile*
devices just to move individual files around on his archaic systems.
It's pathetic.
Jolly Roger ... try this modern F-U-N-C-T-I-O-N-A-L-I-T-Y on primitive iOS?

1. USB
Plug the phone into Windows or Linux (& probably Mac), & it just works.
Loading Image...

2. Wi-Fi
Click on the network drive in the Windows file system & it just works.
Loading Image...

In both cases above, it just works.
- The visible part of the Android file system is accessible & writeable.
- Drag and drop. Both ways. No software needed on Mac, Linux, or Windows.
nospam
2018-03-04 18:43:53 UTC
Permalink
There is a trick to transfer non-photo and video files onto an iPad.
Basically you ZIP what you want to transfer, you rename the .ZIP file to
.NEF (Nikon Raw format), import the NEF file into the iPad, rename it to
a ZIP file, and unzip it.
that's not only a bizarre and overly convoluted method, but there is
*no* trick needed to transfer *anything* to and from an ios device.

why do people insist on doing things in the most convoluted way
possible?
sms
2018-03-04 18:40:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Given that pretty typical situation, they asked me how to back up, where
I'm sure there are multiple approaches, but where it would be useful to ask
what is a good way to back up data from one iPad to another for someone who
has only the default storage that Apple provides on the cloud.
If most of the data is photos and videos, is as often the case, read
<https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201302> and
<https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202037>.

Documents and other content typically do not use much storage space.
Once you transfer the photos and videos onto a computer, you can delete
the photos and videos from the old iPad, sync what's left via iTunes,
then transfer the photos and videos onto the new iPad. Note that you
can't export photos onto an SD card using a Lightning to SD Card adapter
(which is a real pain), you have to export them to a computer, but you
can read certain file formats from an SD card.

There is a trick to transfer non-photo and video files onto an iPad.
Basically you ZIP what you want to transfer, you rename the .ZIP file to
.NEF (Nikon Raw format), import the NEF file into the iPad, rename it to
a ZIP file, and unzip it. See
<https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3422226>. "The key issue here is
to use a file format which the iPad recognises as a photo, but does not
know how to display. The NEF seems to work, but I have also used AVI
format as iPad believes it is a non compatible video file."
Savageduck
2018-03-05 17:28:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by ultred ragnusen
Given that pretty typical situation, they asked me how to back up, where
I'm sure there are multiple approaches, but where it would be useful to ask
what is a good way to back up data from one iPad to another for someone who
has only the default storage that Apple provides on the cloud.
If most of the data is photos and videos, is as often the case, read
<https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201302> and
<https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202037>.
Documents and other content typically do not use much storage space.
Once you transfer the photos and videos onto a computer, you can delete
the photos and videos from the old iPad, sync what's left via iTunes,
then transfer the photos and videos onto the new iPad. Note that you
can't export photos onto an SD card using a Lightning to SD Card adapter
(which is a real pain), you have to export them to a computer, but you
can read certain file formats from an SD card.
There is a trick to transfer non-photo and video files onto an iPad.
Basically you ZIP what you want to transfer, you rename the .ZIP file to
.NEF (Nikon Raw format), import the NEF file into the iPad, rename it to
a ZIP file, and unzip it. See
<https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3422226>. "The key issue here is
to use a file format which the iPad recognises as a photo, but does not
know how to display. The NEF seems to work, but I have also used AVI
format as iPad believes it is a non compatible video file."
<https://www.sandisk.com/home/mobile-device-storage/ixpand>
--
Regards,
Savageduck
sms
2018-03-08 14:40:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
What's the easiest way to move saved data from an iPad mini to iPad 9.7"?
(when neither of the users has a laptop computer)
As a gift, I had a relative in another state (with lower sales tax) buy two
of those $300 128GB iPads from Costco today (they only had one color in
stock) where they called me just now on their drive home to ask a question
about transferring data.
Wait, you kept saying that you would not buy the Wi-Fi only iPads at
Costco because they don't provide location services. What happened?
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-09 03:19:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by ultred ragnusen
As a gift, I had a relative in another state (with lower sales tax) buy two
of those $300 128GB iPads from Costco today (they only had one color in
stock) where they called me just now on their drive home to ask a question
about transferring data.
Wait, you kept saying that you would not buy the Wi-Fi only iPads at
Costco because they don't provide location services. What happened?
It's simple.
Loading Image...

As you know, I give out as gifts something like a dozen mobile devices a
year to friends and family (and they give me mobile devices in turn).

I bought three of these iPads after clearing with the two people that they
didn't need the location services which, as you know, unfortunately, Apple
Marketing ties to cellular data with respect to hardware limitations.

Nonetheless, since I bought two of these for people are aren't technical, I
figured I'd buy a third iPad at Costco (they're cheap enough even though
the total cost of ownership of iOS devices is vastly more expensive than
equivalent Android devices).

So I have yet another iOS device in my hands so that I can help others.
Loading Image...

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